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Child in the City Conference 2016

By Editor on 28th September 2016
Found in: Events
Date and Time: 
Monday, November 7, 2016 - 14:00 to Wednesday, November 9, 2016 - 16:00

Ghent, Belgium

The Child in the City Conference is organised to enable social scientists, researchers, practitioners, politicians and city planners from all over the world to share their thoughts and develop new ideas to meet the needs of children in modern cities.  

This year’s conference themes are:

The SHARPER report by Arup & Partners focuses on how climate change impacts, continued urbanisation and an ageing population are affecting London, New York and Shanghai.  It highlights the risk of heatwaves to the elderly in London, using satellite data to obtain surface temperature maps and socio-economic data (factors such as population density, health, mobility and quality of housing) to develop a Heat Vulnerability Index (HVI) for the city, to gain an understanding of where the population is most at risk. 

A new report by Harry Quilter-Pinner and Laurie Laybourn-Langton for IPPR highlights the impact of air pollution on public health in the UK, and London in particular, where the mortality impact of nitrogen dioxide and particulates in 2010 was estimated to be equivalent to up to 9,400 premature deaths.  Air pollution is therefore the second most significant factor impacting on public health in London, after smoking.  The report finds that London is breaking legal and WHO limits for particulate matter; most air pollution in London is caused by road transport, of which diesel vehicles are the

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, September 13, 2016 - 09:00 to 13:00

London

Professor the Lord Krebs, Chair, Adaptation Sub-Committee, Committee on Climate Change and Professor Ian Boyd, Chief Scientific Adviser, Defra, are key speakers at this seminar which will consider policy priorities for climate change adaptation and planning for the upcoming UK Climate Change Risk Assessment (January 2017). 

The European Environment Agency has published a report stressing the benefits of investing in long-term preventative measures that cities should take to improve their resilience to climate change events, such as more extreme flooding or prolonged heatwaves.  It gives an overview of progress made by in adaptation by cities in the last couple of years and poses the questions: Is what cities are already doing leading to attractive and climate-resilient cities?  If not yet, what needs to change? 

The Adaptation Sub-Committee of the UK Committee on Climate Change has produced an Evidence Report on the risks and opportunities to the UK from climate change, to inform the second (five-yearly) Climate Change Risk Assessment, to be presented to Parliament in 2017.

The report highlights the top six areas of inter-related climate change risks for the UK:

Researchers at the University of Birmingham and Lancaster University, in collaboration with Wilkinson Eyre Architects, used interviews with built environment professionals, together with a critical assessment of sustainability assessment methods, to explore whether sustainability measures constrain creativity and innovation in urban design. 

Sustainability Citizenship in Cities

By Editor on 15th June 2016
Found in: Research and Resources

This new book, published by Earthscan/Routledge, seeks to explain how sustainability citizenship can manifest in urban built environments as both responsibilities and rights. Contributors elaborate on the concept of urban sustainability citizenship as a participatory work-in-progress with the aim of setting its practice firmly on the agenda.

Date and Time: 
Friday, July 1, 2016 - 09:30 to 16:00

London

This seminar will examine the role of outdoor environments in supporting physical activity and associated health and wellbeing amongst older people. Outdoor environments have significant potential to promote, support and motivate physical activity, whether recreational or functional. 

The seminar will include sessions on:

Poverty, place and inequality

By Editor on 18th May 2016
Found in: Research and Resources

A new policy paper from the Royal Town Planning Institute (RTPI) identifies the profound effect that the built environment can have on people’s behaviours and opportunities, either limiting or enhancing their wellbeing and life chances.  It argues that ‘people-based’ approaches are not enough on their own to tackle issues such as poverty, inequality and anti-social behaviour.  Better built environments and stronger place-based initiatives can support and promote employment, educational achievement, better health and improved social mobility alongside conventional approaches which focus on w

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