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Sustainability of liquid biofuels

By Robert Lyons on 18th July 2017
Found in: Research and Resources

A new report by the Royal Academy of Engineering suggests that the UK should focus on the use of waste for the production of biofuels rather than crops that might displace food production. The authors argue that ncentives should be given to farmers to increase production of fuel crops like Miscanthus on marginal land and note that even with the greater use of electric vehicles, biofuels will still be needed for aviation and heavy goods.

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A new paper for Nature Scientific Reports arguest that while diesel-engined vehicles are currently a major source of particulate pollution, modern diesel vehicles actually produce lower levels of such emissions than petrol-engined cars. Whether gasoline or diesel cars are more polluting depends on the pollutant in question - in other words, that diesel cars are not necessarily worse polluters than gasoline cars.

This briefing sets out why the scale of the air pollution problem in the UK requires a bolder and more holistic approach, which involves moving away from diesel vehicles (in favour of petrol and, ultimately, hybrid and electric alternatives), as well as a shift from private car ownership to car sharing schemes, public transport, walking and cycling. Not only could these shifts save thousands of lives, they could also drive improvements in two of the government’s other transport objectives: a reduction in congestion, and a reduction in road-based CO2 emissions.

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, June 27, 2017 - 09:30 to 19:00

London

This year's LowCVP annual conference will coincide with the publication of new transport and environment strategies for the capital. It will focus on how city-level policy needs to adapt to tackle the twin challenges of climate change and air pollution in an era of ‘mobility revolution’.

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What impact can hydrogen and fuel cell technologies have in addressing the energy trilemma: energy security, energy cost, and CO2 emissions?

The H2FC SUPERGEN commissioned four evidence-based White Papers to inform key stakeholders, especially policy makers, of the roles and potential benefits of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in addressing:

Seventh International Symposium on Energy

By Robert Lyons on 27th March 2017
Found in: Events
Date and Time: 
Sunday, August 13, 2017 - 17:30 to Thursday, August 17, 2017 - 17:00

Manchester

A new report by the House of Commons Environmental Audit Committee argues that the government needs to set out new modelling on air quality following the High Court’s latest ruling and a new approach to air quality post 2019; an emissions reduction strategy that will allow the UK’s carbon budgets to be met; and effective noise mitigation measures enforced by an Independent Aviation Noise Authority. The Government must not allow our air quality standards to be watered down as a result of leaving the EU.

Date and Time: 
Friday, January 20, 2017 - 09:30 to 15:30

Open University, Milton Keynes

Part of the ESRC Seminar Series (2015-17) – Green Innovation: Making it Work.

The Low Emission Bus Guide

By Robert Lyons on 9th November 2016
Found in: Research and Resources

The Low Carbon Vehicle Partnership (LowCVP) has produced a new guide to low emission buses that is intended to equip bus operators and local authorities with information to aid purchasing decisions, and encourage the adoption of the most appropriate low emission bus technology and associated infrastructure for particular routes and applications. 

The Guide includes real-world bus operator case studies to highlight and demonstrate the environmental and business cases for the range of different technologies and fuels. 

Date and Time: 
Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 10:00 to 17:30

County Hall, Westminster, London

Post Brexit, there is an emerging policy direction that puts infrastructure investment in the centre of an activist fiscal policy and the re-invention of industrial strategy. This is all framed around delivering fairness and inclusion to heal the social chasm revealed by the Brexit vote. 

This raises a huge range of new questions for infrastructure policy makers, strategists and deliverers such as:

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